• Study mode: Full Time
  • Location: High Wycombe Campus
  • Duration: Three Years
  • Start Date: September 2018

Course Overview

Computing and Web Development focuses on the technical side of web-based applications and services for working in industries that require expertise in Web and Mobile Development, IT Support, Software Development and Network industries.

As well as preparing you for employment in a globally expanding computing industry, this course gives you the skills and knowledge to pursue careers in a wide range of sectors that depend on digital technologies. These include retail, media, government, education, health sectors and many other computing-specialist areas of industry, finance and commerce.

Web developers are highly desirable for employers

BSc (Hons) Computing and Web Development is founded in software engineering and web technologies. It includes modules on developing and deploying secure and mobile-ready web applications with backend databases. You’ll learn alternative architectures for emerging cloud-based technologies. And you’ll by preparing for both generic ‘computing’ job markets and more specialised areas that require mobile web-based services. Both these aspects are much sought after by UK and international employers.

Learn more than just programming websites

Learn skills beyond the core technologies of web programming. If you enjoy ‘code’ there are many opportunities to extend your knowledge to new programming and database management languages. You will also develop technical competency in user-interface and location-sensitive frameworks, industry-standards for secure and robust software engineering, database development and network operation.

The course addresses the professional and customer-facing skills that are essential for employment in computing industries. Modules also provide opportunities to prepare for the professional certification programmes of global industries such as Microsoft, HP and Cisco.

Course Details

UCAS CODE: GW4F

We’ve amassed a diverse range of expertise over the years, giving more and more students the opportunity to specialise in specific areas within computing. We’ve invested in the best facilities for your next step into a computing career. The Computing Department and our Careers service also offer development opportunities that may involve placements, internships or employment in local companies.

Expert teaching from professional developers

Our lecturers work closely with industry through partnerships or by helping web development and related industries with research, consultancy, technical and managerial inputs. These relationships provide a professional edge to our teaching. They are also a useful source of internship and industry-brief opportunities for our students.

Start your career in web development from day one

We give you every opportunity to expand your programming knowledge. In the first year, you’ll acquire programming, network, and professional skills.

In your second year you will expand these to more advanced web applications, architectures, databases and emerging standards for mobile and cloud deployment of services.

In your final year you will consolidate skills in web application development and pursue specialisms in mobile, database and Artificial Intelligence technologies. You will also integrate your skills and showcase your knowledge by undertaking a Final Year Project. Many students also benefit from industry placement opportunities in their final year.

We’ve designed the course to give you the skills and knowledge to pursue a wide range of careers in the digital industries. The Department of Computing graduate successes include employment with international companies, such as IBM, SAP, HS2, Honda, BT and Capita, as well as a many smaller but locally established companies providing web and other digital services to media and health concerns.

Teaching and Learning

Your course consists of a combination of structured learning and teaching activities and independent learning.

Structured learning activities include lectures, seminars, tutorials and other time-tabled sessions. The amount of time set aside for each activity (‘contact hours’) is set out in individual module descriptors and so will vary depending on the modules you take. When you are not attending structured learning and teaching activities you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically this will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, using the library, preparing for seminars, and completing coursework assignments.

The programme specification will provide more information on the specific learning and teaching activities on this course.

Overall workload

Your overall workload will include your learning and teaching activities and independent learning with total study time of around 10 hours being worth 1 credit. While your actual contact hours will depend on any option modules you choose.

Year 1: percent of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity

Teaching, learning and assessment: hours
Independent learning: hours

Year 2: percent of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity

Teaching, learning and assessment: hours
Independent learning: hours

Year 3: percent of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity

Teaching, learning and assessment: hours
Independent learning: hours

Assessment

You will be given opportunities to test your understanding of the subject informally before you complete the formal assessments that count towards your final mark. This may take the form of practice or ‘formative’ assessments for which you will receive feedback from your tutor. Formative assessments are developmental and any marks you receive do not count towards your overall module mark. There is at least one formal or ‘summative’ assessment towards the end of each module. The marks from summative assessments do count towards your overall module mark.

Assessment methods vary, but your programme specification will provide more information on the specific methods used on this course. You can find out more about the assessment methods used across the University in the assessment guide on the Academic Advice pages.

Balance of assessment

The balance of assessment will vary depending on any option modules you choose.

Please note: The percentages below do not include any pass/fail elements as these do not contribute to the overall degree classification. All modules must be successfully completed for credit to be awarded.

Year 1

percent coursework percent written exams percent practical

Year 2

percent coursework percent written exams percent practical

Year 3

percent coursework percent written exams percent practical

Feedback

You will receive feedback on all assessed coursework and practical assignments and we aim to provide this within three weeks. Feedback on examinations is also available on request.

Assessment feedback is intended to help you learn and you are encouraged to discuss it with your module leader.

What are the course entry requirements?

A typical offer will include GCSE Maths and English at grade C or above and a UCAS Tariff score of 80-96. A minimum of two full A-levels (or equivalent) is required. Every application is considered on an individual basis.

Students may also apply for direct entry to this course subject to verifying the level and relevance of prior experience and qualifications.

We consider each application on an individual basis meaning that the circumstances of all applicants are taken into detailed consideration.

Knowledge and experience in computing is helpful, but not essential.

Course Modules

Module Map

This module map provides a list of the modules that make up your course.

Each module is worth a specified number of credits (typically either 15 or 30 credits for undergraduate courses). Compulsory (or ‘core’) modules cover key subject knowledge, while ‘option’ modules enable you to develop your own interests. For a full-time course you must take modules worth a total of 120 credits at each level of the course. The number of option modules you can take depends on the number of compulsory modules at each level. You can find more information about how your course is structured via the Academic Advice pages.

Our teaching is informed by research and employer requirements, and modules change periodically to reflect developments in the subject area. In addition, where we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an option module, this may not be offered. If an option module does not run, we will advise you as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

The modules available on this course are as follows:

Year 1 Modules

  • Application Programming
  • Computer Architectures
  • Digital Technologies and Professional Practice
  • Networking
  • Programming Concepts
  • User Experience (UX)
  • Web Development
  • XML

Year 2 Modules

  • Database Design
  • Mobile Systems
  • Network Systems
  • Object Oriented Systems Development
  • Open Source Systems
  • Software Engineering
  • Web Applications
  • Web Services (Team Project)

Year 3 Modules

  • Advanced Mobile Systems (optional)
  • Advanced Programming
  • Cloud Computing
  • Data Structures and Algorithms
  • Database Development (optional)
  • Database Technologies (optional)
  • E-Business Systems Development
  • Enterprise Systems Development
  • Knowledge-Based Systems in A.I. (optional)
  • Learning Machines and Intelligent Agents (optional)
  • Network Security
  • Project

Fees

How much does it cost

Fees for September 2017 to August 2018 entry

Full Time Home and EU: £9,250 per year

Full Time International: £10,500 per year

Most courses will involve some additional costs that are not covered by your fees.

Fees quoted are for the next intake and are subject to change. Fee costs for subsequent years may rise in line with inflation, course delivery costs or subject to government regulations.

For information on financial assistance to support your learning, visit our Undergraduate Fees and Funding section.

Questions about fees?

Contact our Student Centre on:
01494 603 020
student.centre@bucks.ac.uk

How do I apply?

For application details please visit bucks.ac.uk/applynow

Employability

What are my career prospects

As this course combines computer theory with web development, you’ll come away with many skills that are in demand. You’ll be able to go further in a career in the IT and digital-based sectors.

An online presence is now vital for every business. You’ll be able to develop and maintain their internal web-based systems and show them the benefits of distributed frameworks, services and social-media applications.

Graduates may also continue studies towards postgraduate and professional certification, or to specialise in the emerging challenges of cyber security and big data analytics.

How will you help me prepare for my future career?

Throughout the time you spend with us, we’ll support you on route to your chosen career. We’ll help you to develop crucial skills, encouraging you to become enterprising, employable, and good leaders.

We run work placements for our students, giving you the opportunity to develop within a work background. Our modules and teaching expertise will help you become more independent as a learner and more certain of your discipline expertise.

We also help you find employment after graduation. Have a look at our Careers and Employability pages to find out more.